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Cuomo Announces More Than $30 Million IN New NY Broadband Round III Awards For Southern Tier

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Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced $30.8 million in New NY Broadband Program Round III grants have been awarded in the Southern Tier. The awards will drive more than $46.4 million of public-private broadband investment and provide 17,796 homes and other locations in the region with access to high-speed internet. The grants were awarded as part of the third and final round of the program, fulfilling the Governor's promise to connect all New Yorkers to high-speed internet for the first time in state history.

"Access to high-speed internet has never been more important for New York residents and businesses," Governor Cuomo said. "By leveraging state investments with private and federal funding, we are building a stronger, smarter and more competitive New York poised to lead the nation as the first state to achieve total connectivity."

In total, 13 awarded projects will address unserved territories in the Southern Tier. Nearly 1,500 miles of broadband infrastructure will be deployed, providing residents and companies across the region with access to new economic opportunities. When the New NY Broadband Program was launched in 2015, 89 percent of Southern Tier residents - over 273,000 homes - lacked access to broadband.

The regional awards announced today are part of the total $225.5 million in New NY Broadband Program Round III grants. This state investment will drive a Round III total of $385.5 million in broadband infrastructure and support connections for nearly 129,000 locations. These awards include the Round III funds previously announced, plus an additional $15.8 million in grants the state has awarded to complete the program funding.

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When the New NY Broadband Program was launched in 2015, 30 percent of New Yorkers - approximately 2.42 million locations - lacked access to broadband. This was most acute in the eight Upstate Regional Economic Development Council regions, where only 35 percent of New Yorkers had access. As a result of the Program's Round I awards and additional state-secured upgrades, broadband access was expanded by more than 2.2 million locations to 97 percent of New Yorkers. Round II awards then extended coverage to more than 80,000 locations to 98 percent of New Yorkers. Today, with the announcement of Round III awards, the Program accomplishes its mission of statewide broadband availability, providing the last mile funding to ensure all New Yorkers have access to high-speed internet by the end of 2018.

The program's goal was to achieve statewide access to internet download speeds of at least 100 Megabits per second and 25 Megabits per second in the most rural and remote areas. After full implementation of the commitments announced, 99.9 percent of New Yorkers will have access to high-speed broadband - with almost 99 percent at speeds of 100 Megabits per second or greater. Consistent with the program's prioritization of unserved areas, of the broadband funds deployed, nearly 90 percent of all funding was awarded to projects that will address unserved areas of the state, connecting these locations for the first time.

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Chris    423

The 2000 census has there being 362 housing units in Baldwin, and then in 2010 388. Some of that difference may depend on lines used when doing the surveys I think. 

But still, 384 locations targeted to be connected seems kinda high. I'm wondering if some of those locations are outside the actual township but on that same network. 

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KReed    158

I wasn't aware of any areas in the Village of Horseheads that didn't already have cable broadband.....while the Town of Horseheads certainly has limited options. But they aren't on the list?

 

This is why I don't think I'll ever be a fan of tax money being used to pick the players and winners in any consumer market. Choosing which providers and which customers we subsidize leaves too much room for favoritism and pay to play. 

 

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KReed    158
18 minutes ago, Chris said:

The 2000 census has there being 362 housing units in Baldwin, and then in 2010 388. Some of that difference may depend on lines used when doing the surveys I think. 

But still, 384 locations targeted to be connected seems kinda high. I'm wondering if some of those locations are outside the actual township but on that same network. 

 

That $1,184,641 rounds out to about $3,000 per household (and this appears to be going to the municipalities themselves, so I assume this is separate from the last round of grants distributed to various providers).

No offense to some of the fine citizens of Baldwin, but does that really seem like a good deal for the money?

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Chris    423

I believe the money is actually going to the providers, I just didn't include the graphics that detailed how much goes to each. 

The way I read this, the total investment includes money invested by the companies as well. 

Dividing only the state grant portion only, by their 384 households and it comes out to $1750. Or about $800 and change per person. If it means we can finally enter the 21st Century ( at least in this way ) I'm okay with that. Especially after spending years watching "underserved" areas get what was actually an upgrade to their already existing broadband. 

But even at $3000 per household, it's a necessary investment in the future of a community that has been losing younger, working families due to lack of services.

I admit to being biased though, considering the amount of money we've spent over the past 5 years to have high speed internet. 

 

 

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